Review: The Peregrine Glove

The Peregrine GloveI was recently emailed about an interesting concept that may have definite applications to the work I do. Curious, I followed the link and gazed at the screen.

Was I really seeing what I thought I was seeing? After pinching myself, I hit the “order” button. With a price point of only $149 I had to give it a try.

The Peregrine is a left-handed glove equipped with sensors that execute keyboard commands. It is actually recognized as a keyboard by a computer’s operating system. In order to activate keyboard strokes, the user touches sensors on the glove. No more reaching for the keyboard to complete redundant shortcuts.

Created by founder Brent Baier of Iron Will Innovations, its primary market was originally gamers. Before long though, many other applications became obvious.

The Peregrine Glove

HOW DOES IT WORK?

  • The glove itself uses wires and metal contact points to activate keyboard commands. The wires are sewn into the fabric and come together at the gold-plated pod base.
  • The pod is the brains of the operation. When attached to the glove, it relays the commands to the computer.
  • Customization is the key here. The software included, cleverly named the “Glove Box”, is where the user assigns commands to each sensor.

Glove Box

The glove is made of lightweight but sturdy material. It has ventilation built in preventing the hand from getting hot and sweaty.

Even with ventilation, there will come a time when the glove needs a wash. No problem. It is completely hand washable.

Three sizes are available. I initially started with the “small” size, but found that the medium was a better fit. I used the website’s sizing guide to determine which size was best. But, I did not consider that I have medium to long fingernails.

The Peregrine is wired to the computer through the pod. It connects with a 6′ USB connector.

One of the more clever aspects is that the pod is connected to the glove with a magnet. It satisfies a number of issues:

  • It holds on tight when in use
  • It allows the user to simply pop it off without unmounting the actual device
  • It will pop off if the user accidentally walks away from the computer while still attached. I have done this a number of times and been grateful when it did not yank out the USB connection or pull on my computer.

REAL WORLD APPLICATIONS

The Peregrine was originally designed for video gamers. So how does it fit into my world as a photographer?

I have been working full time with a computer for 17 years. With that came thousands of hours sitting and performing millions of redundant keyboarding tasks. Needless to say, I now have degenerative disk disease and serious nerve issues. I am relegated to standing when I work.

Shortly before discovering The Peregrine, there were questions whether I should hang up my tablet and stop working in this industry altogether.

With a combination of scepticism and hope, I spent a month working with The Peregrine.

My primary software choice is Photoshop. I was able to program The Peregrine to accept my most used keyboard shortcuts. With 32 sensors on the glove, it covered a lot of ground.

At the time of testing, the glove did have issues with certain macros. The “Save for Web” shortcut within Photoshop was one of them. My solution was to simply change the default keyboard shortcut within Photoshop’s preferences. That did the trick.

Here are some of the shortcuts I have programmed into my glove:

  • Shift, control, and alt
  • Enter
  • Tool selection shortcuts: brush, marque, clone, select, text
  • Open, new, save, save for web
  • New layer
  • Undo

It took me a couple of times to decide which keyboard commands I should assign to each sensor. I would print a screen capture of the “Glove Box” diagram so that I could easily reference it as I practised and worked.

Although I mainly use my glove for Photoshop, The Peregrine provides for 5 different profiles. This allows customizing for different users or software.

I am now at a point where I barely touch my keyboard. My muscle memory has kicked in and my work now progresses quickly and painlessly.

If you are currently experiencing the effects of repetitive stress, or are concerned that you will, I strongly recommend investigating The Peregrine. It just may be what the doctor ordered.

Author Bio

lisasolonynko

An award winning professional photographer currently working in Ontario, Canada. Lisa’s passion remains creating images that are dynamic and thought provoking. When reflecting on what it means to be a photographer in the 21st century she explains, “We live in a fantastic time, photographically. Technology is progressing so quickly and is so powerful. Coupling emerging technology with our natural environment provides so many possibilities for people to view and enjoy photography”. Lisa’s images have appeared in many publications and media campaigns including: King’s College (UK), Pinpoint Medical, Simon Fraser University, and University of Exeter (UK). In 2011, Lisa founded CWPNetwork.com whose goal is to provide networking and education opportunities for Canadian women photographers.